Bones Bearings Skateboards at Warehouse Skateboards

Bones Bearings Skateboards

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Bones Bearings Skateboard Bearings

Bones Bearings Skateboard Bearings

Bones Bearings Skateboard Lube

Bones Bearings Skateboard Lube

Bones Bearings Skateboard Skate Tools

Bones Bearings Skateboard Tools

Bones Bearings Construction Technology

The standard by which all other bearings are measured. Bones Swiss Skateboard Bearings have the best reputation in the skateboard industry, and have had this honor for the past 26 years because of their performance and quality. Everyone who rides Swiss knows how fast they are, and most also comment on how long they last, typically several times as long as low cost bearings. Skaters who use Bones Swiss do so because they want the very best equipment they can get and they know the difference between ordinary and exceptional. The Bones Team is a who’s who of top skaters and we are proud to be associated with each one of them. 

ABEC vs. Skate Rated : “What ABEC rating are your bearings?”
 
Bones Bearings component parts are engineered and tested to withstand the high impacts of hard landings, the high side loads of turning, and (to the extent possible) the dirt of skate environments. As a result, Bones roll faster and last longer than other bearings. To merely give Bones an ABEC rating would be to ignore all the improvements we have engineered into Bones and the resulting difference between Bones and standard ABEC rated bearings. Since there is no appropriate ABEC rating that will reflect the superior quality of Bones Bearings, we have given them their own rating, Skate Rating, to let you know that Bones Bearings are special and made just for skaters like you, not for electric motors. See full article: ABEC VS. SKATE RATED.


History of Bones Bearings

By George A. Powell

In the early 1980s, skateboarding was at a low ebb and it was difficult to find top quality bearings. American bearing companies like Fafnir had vacated the bearing market because the Japanese produced vast quantities of lower cost bearings and U.S. companies could not compete at the price Japanese bearings were selling for. The Japanese bearings were of good quality but were not very fast. German bearings were better, but many skaters wanted an even faster bearing to help them go higher on vert ramps or to roll farther with each push.

Seeing this need, I set out to find the best bearing I could that would still be affordable to skaters. I looked in America and in Europe. My search ended at a small, custom bearing manufacturer in Switzerland. Their bearings were faster than any we had ever tested before and, at the time, only a little more expensive than German bearings.

I worked with the Swiss manufacturer to optimize a bearing for skating. I changed from a standard stamped metal ball retainer to a high speed precision molded plastic one that could be removed by skaters to allow better cleaning of the bearing. We left one shield off so skaters could get to the inside of the bearing without any tools to clean and re-lubricate it. Next, we adjusted the tolerances and clearances to allow the bearing to take the combination side and vertical loads imposed by skating better than normal bearings do (which are mostly designed for electric motors). Finally, we replaced the usual lubricant with a special one we developed ourselves called Bones Speed Cream™.

Re-engineering this fine bearing for skating produced the fastest, most sought after, most competition successful bearing in the history of our sport. In fact, it is still the fastest bearing you can buy for skating even after all these years and after many other companies have packaged and hyped you to buy their ABEC-1, 3, 5, 7 or 9 “super bearings” with cartoon characters, racy names or whatever.

We test all these bearings with custom equipment we have made to compare the important qualities of bearings like drag and vibration at high speeds and extended roll at low and medium speeds. Then we have our team ride the bearings until the bearings “die” to see how long they will last and how they perform in actual skating environments. Some of the bearings you will see advertised or sold in shops are junk and some are pretty good, but no bearing we have ever tested has equaled the performance of Bones Swiss. See full article: Bones Bearings History

The width of your truck axle should closely match the width of your skateboard deck, usually within 1/4”.

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Skateboard Trucks Buying Guide

Truck height is measured from the bottom of the truck’s baseplate to the center of the axle. In general, a mid-sized truck works well for most skateboarders, but high or low trucks may be preferred for different styles of skaters.

LO - Provides extra stability for flip tricks, designed for small wheels (50-53mm wheel size recommended).

MID - Good all-around profile for street or park (53-56mm wheel size recommended).

HIGH - Great for cruising and carving, designed for large wheels (56mm+ wheel size recommended).

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Skateboard Trucks Buying Guide

The hanger is the truck's T-shaped aluminum alloy grind area. It makes direct contact with rails and curbs. The hanger holds the axle on which the wheels are mounted. Hangers weigh about 10-13 oz, with lighter ones available. The width of your truck axle should closely match the width of your skateboard deck, usually within 1/4”.

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Skateboard Trucks Buying Guide

Construction refers to the material(s) used in fabrication or the specific brand technology.

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Skateboard Buying Guide

The average width of a skateboard deck is 7.5"- 8.25". Width is influenced by the size of the rider and the type of riding. Bigger riders and those skating ramps typically prefer a wider deck. Street skaters usually choose a smaller deck. Choose your skateboard deck according to the width, not length. Here are some general guidelines:

MICRO - Deck width: 6.75" or smaller - 5 years old or younger, under 3'4" tall. Size 3 shoes or smaller.

MINI - Deck width: 7.0" - 6 to 8 years old between 3'5" & 4'4" tall. Size 4-6 shoes.

MID - Deck width: 7.3" - 9 to 12 years old between 4'5" & 5'2" tall. Size 7-8 shoes.

FULL - Deck width: 7.5" or larger - for all skaters over age 13, taller than 5'3" with a shoe size of 9 or up.


7.5" to 8"
Standard board for adult riders skating streets or doing more technical tricks

8.0" to 8.25"
Skating pools, ramps and parks

8.25" and larger
Vert, pools, cruising and just going old school

Still having a hard time with size, try our Skateboard Sizer

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Skateboard Decks Buying Guide

Deck type refers to the size or style (shape) of the skateboard deck. If you are a beginner, choose your deck according to the width, not the length. The width you need depends on your size, skating style and personal preference. Here are some general guidelines:

MICRO - Deck width: 6.75" or smaller - 5 years old or younger, under 3'4" tall. Size 3 shoes or smaller.

MINI - Deck width: 7.0" - 6 to 8 years old between 3'5" & 4'4" tall. Size 4-6 shoes.

MID - Deck width: 7.3" - 9 to 12 years old between 4'5" & 5'2" tall. Size 7-8 shoes.

FULL - Deck width: 7.5" or larger - for all skaters over age 13, taller than 5'3" with a shoe size of 9 or up.


Cruisers, Old School, Freestyle, Longboard and Downhill all refer to a skateboarding style and the corresponding shape.

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Skateboard Decks Buying Guide

Length is measured from the tip of the nose to the tip of the tail. Average board length is 28"- 32" and longboards can range 32" and larger, but length is only referred to by advanced skaters.

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Skateboard Decks Buying Guide

Wheel size or diameter - All Skateboard wheels are measured in millimeters (mm). The smaller the number, the smaller the wheel. Smaller wheels are slower; bigger wheels are faster.

50-53mm - Small slower wheels, stable for trick riding and smaller riders skating street, skate parks and bowls.

54-59mm - Average wheel size for beginners and bigger riders skating street, skate parks, bowls and vert ramps.

60mm + - Specialty riders skating longboards, old-school boards, downhill and dirt boards; made for speed and rougher surfaces.

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Skateboard Wheels Buying Guide

Durometer measures the wheel’s hardness. Harder wheels are faster; softer wheels are slower but have better grip.

78a-87a - Soft wheel good for rough surfaces, longboards or street boards that need lots of grip and easier to roll over cracks and pebbles. Designed for a smooth ride cruising, longboards, hills and rough surfaces.

88a-95a - Slightly harder and faster with a little less grip, but the grip's still good. Street; rough surfaces.

96a-99a - Good speed and grip - an all-around wheel. Great for beginners skating street, skate parks, ramps and pools. Smooth surfaces.

101a + - Hardest and fastest wheel with the least grip. Ineffective on slick and rough surfaces. These are pro wheels.

83b-84b - Wheels using the B scale are extremely hard, measuring 20 points lower than the the A Scale in order to allow the scale to extend another 20 points for harder wheels.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Wheels Buying Guide

The laws for skateboarding helmets vary from state to state. Many states require that skaters wear a helmet under a certain age, and some states like California make all skaters under 18 wear a CPSC Certified helmet at all times. CSPC skateboard helmets usually have an EPS protective liner that meets the safety standards for skateboarding. Make sure you check your state's regulations before ordering.

CPSC Certified Helmets: California requires that all skateboard helmets must meet the requirements of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). Section 890.4 of the Streets and Highways Code enforces these standards in California and will not allow Warehouse Skateboards to ship non-CPSC Certified helmets to California.

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Skateboard Helmets Guide

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Most bearings are measured by an ABEC rating. The higher the ABEC rating, the more accurate and precise the bearing will be. This rating system includes grades 1,3,5,7 and 9. The closer you get to an ABEC 9 rating, the faster and less friction you will have when skateboarding.

Many companies do not use the ABEC rating scale. They brand their own specific technology.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Bearings Buying Guide

Note: Each brands skateboard helmet size will vary; therefore, it is best to measure your head and refer to the sizing chart specific to each brand of helmet. In order to properly measure your head, follow these steps:

Wrap a soft tape measure around your forehead, just above your eyebrows and ears. Keep the tape measure level from the front to the back of your head. Your skateboard helmet should sit low on your forehead.

If you do not have a flexible tape measure, try marking a string and measuring it against a ruler.

If the helmet is a gift or you cannot measure the skater's head, measure the inside of a current helmet or hat they wear.

Within each skateboard helmet product page there are specific measurements for each skate brand. Use that information, along with your head size, to determine your correct helmet size before placing your order. This will ensure that you receive the best fit.

For additional info visit our
Sizing Skateboard Helmets

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