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Ace Skateboard Trucks

About Ace Trucks

Established in 2006 by Steve Ruge and Joey Tershay, Ace is a skateboard truck company located in Los Angeles, California. The company prides itself on providing the “world's best skateboard trucks," and skaters of all skill levels around the world completely back Ace’s claim. Constructed of titanium axles and steel kingpins, Ace skateboard trucks are extremely high quality, engineered with the needs of hardcore skateboarders in mind. The brand has perfected its trucks in order for you to do things you never thought you could on a skateboard! Ace puts other brands to shame because its trucks are thicker in the center for added strength against shock. Ace skateboard trucks are simple and slim with controlled stability. Available in a variety of styles to choose from, the kingpin is also built into the truck at different heights. The lower the kingpin is set in your truck, the smoother you can grind against railings and curbs. If you prefer easy gliding and turning, then Ace trucks are the brand for you! Ace trucks can withstand long skateboarding sessions on any terrain without wearing down or breaking. Their trucks come in several colors to match your skateboard deck and wheels. Is Ace the best truck brand in the world? Try out their trucks and decide for yourself!

Ace focuses on skateboard trucks because they know it’s the most important component for skateboard performance. Choose Ace as your truck brand and feel the difference in the way you ride!

Ace Trucks

Ace Trucks

Ace Trucks

The width of your truck axle should closely match the width of your skateboard deck, usually within 1/4”.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Trucks Buying Guide

Truck height is measured from the bottom of the truck’s baseplate to the center of the axle. In general, a mid-sized truck works well for most skateboarders, but high or low trucks may be preferred for different styles of skaters.

LO - Provides extra stability for flip tricks, designed for small wheels (50-53mm wheel size recommended).

MID - Good all-around profile for street or park (53-56mm wheel size recommended).

HIGH - Great for cruising and carving, designed for large wheels (56mm+ wheel size recommended).

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Trucks Buying Guide

The hanger is the truck's T-shaped aluminum alloy grind area. It makes direct contact with rails and curbs. The hanger holds the axle on which the wheels are mounted. Hangers weigh about 10-13 oz, with lighter ones available. The width of your truck axle should closely match the width of your skateboard deck, usually within 1/4”.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Trucks Buying Guide

Construction refers to the material(s) used in fabrication or the specific brand technology.

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Skateboard Buying Guide

The average width of a skateboard deck is 7.5"- 8.25". Width is influenced by the size of the rider and the type of riding. Bigger riders and those skating ramps typically prefer a wider deck. Street skaters usually choose a smaller deck. Choose your skateboard deck according to the width, not length. Here are some general guidelines:

MICRO - Deck width: 6.75" or smaller - 5 years old or younger, under 3'4" tall. Size 3 shoes or smaller.

MINI - Deck width: 7.0" - 6 to 8 years old between 3'5" & 4'4" tall. Size 4-6 shoes.

MID - Deck width: 7.3" - 9 to 12 years old between 4'5" & 5'2" tall. Size 7-8 shoes.

FULL - Deck width: 7.5" or larger - for all skaters over age 13, taller than 5'3" with a shoe size of 9 or up.


7.5" to 8"
Standard board for adult riders skating streets or doing more technical tricks

8.0" to 8.25"
Skating pools, ramps and parks

8.25" and larger
Vert, pools, cruising and just going old school

Still having a hard time with size, try our Skateboard Sizer

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Decks Buying Guide

Deck type refers to the size or style (shape) of the skateboard deck. If you are a beginner, choose your deck according to the width, not the length. The width you need depends on your size, skating style and personal preference. Here are some general guidelines:

MICRO - Deck width: 6.75" or smaller - 5 years old or younger, under 3'4" tall. Size 3 shoes or smaller.

MINI - Deck width: 7.0" - 6 to 8 years old between 3'5" & 4'4" tall. Size 4-6 shoes.

MID - Deck width: 7.3" - 9 to 12 years old between 4'5" & 5'2" tall. Size 7-8 shoes.

FULL - Deck width: 7.5" or larger - for all skaters over age 13, taller than 5'3" with a shoe size of 9 or up.


Cruisers, Old School, Freestyle, Longboard and Downhill all refer to a skateboarding style and the corresponding shape.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Decks Buying Guide

Length is measured from the tip of the nose to the tip of the tail. Average board length is 28"- 32" and longboards can range 32" and larger, but length is only referred to by advanced skaters.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Decks Buying Guide

Wheel size or diameter - All Skateboard wheels are measured in millimeters (mm). The smaller the number, the smaller the wheel. Smaller wheels are slower; bigger wheels are faster.

50-53mm - Small slower wheels, stable for trick riding and smaller riders skating street, skate parks and bowls.

54-59mm - Average wheel size for beginners and bigger riders skating street, skate parks, bowls and vert ramps.

60mm + - Specialty riders skating longboards, old-school boards, downhill and dirt boards; made for speed and rougher surfaces.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Wheels Buying Guide

Durometer measures the wheel’s hardness. Harder wheels are faster; softer wheels are slower but have better grip.

78a-87a - Soft wheel good for rough surfaces, longboards or street boards that need lots of grip and easier to roll over cracks and pebbles. Designed for a smooth ride cruising, longboards, hills and rough surfaces.

88a-95a - Slightly harder and faster with a little less grip, but the grip's still good. Street; rough surfaces.

96a-99a - Good speed and grip - an all-around wheel. Great for beginners skating street, skate parks, ramps and pools. Smooth surfaces.

101a + - Hardest and fastest wheel with the least grip. Ineffective on slick and rough surfaces. These are pro wheels.

83b-84b - Wheels using the B scale are extremely hard, measuring 20 points lower than the the A Scale in order to allow the scale to extend another 20 points for harder wheels.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Wheels Buying Guide

The laws for skateboarding helmets vary from state to state. Many states require that skaters wear a helmet under a certain age, and some states like California make all skaters under 18 wear a CPSC Certified helmet at all times. CSPC skateboard helmets usually have an EPS protective liner that meets the safety standards for skateboarding. Make sure you check your state's regulations before ordering.

CPSC Certified Helmets: California requires that all skateboard helmets must meet the requirements of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). Section 890.4 of the Streets and Highways Code enforces these standards in California and will not allow Warehouse Skateboards to ship non-CPSC Certified helmets to California.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Helmets Guide

Unsure of the size you need?
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Most bearings are measured by an ABEC rating. The higher the ABEC rating, the more accurate and precise the bearing will be. This rating system includes grades 1,3,5,7 and 9. The closer you get to an ABEC 9 rating, the faster and less friction you will have when skateboarding.

Many companies do not use the ABEC rating scale. They brand their own specific technology.

For additional info visit our
Skateboard Bearings Buying Guide

Note: Each brands skateboard helmet size will vary; therefore, it is best to measure your head and refer to the sizing chart specific to each brand of helmet. In order to properly measure your head, follow these steps:

Wrap a soft tape measure around your forehead, just above your eyebrows and ears. Keep the tape measure level from the front to the back of your head. Your skateboard helmet should sit low on your forehead.

If you do not have a flexible tape measure, try marking a string and measuring it against a ruler.

If the helmet is a gift or you cannot measure the skater's head, measure the inside of a current helmet or hat they wear.

Within each skateboard helmet product page there are specific measurements for each skate brand. Use that information, along with your head size, to determine your correct helmet size before placing your order. This will ensure that you receive the best fit.

For additional info visit our
Sizing Skateboard Helmets

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